1. Shopping the streets of La Paz. Those last two pics are of the peach juice that is sold throughout the city. You choose which type of peach you want and how many and they whip up a plastic to-go drinking bag for you. Its super sweet but very tasty. No stomach upset to be had!

  2. Spotted this guy resting on the top of a truck as we drove through the city in a taxi. How tired must one be to pull this off?

    Spotted this guy resting on the top of a truck as we drove through the city in a taxi. How tired must one be to pull this off?

  3. This is the famed San Pedro prison in La Paz. Apparently there were illegal tours being run, letting tourists get a view from the inside, but a friendly (and a little crazy) homeless guy from Brooklyn, advised me it was recently shut dow. Ah well, sometimes the law rears its ugly head. I won’t risk too much fact checking here, but I was informed it’s like a little village inside there; In-mates can have their families come live with them and can score evenings out on the town if they do good with the guards.

    This is the famed San Pedro prison in La Paz. Apparently there were illegal tours being run, letting tourists get a view from the inside, but a friendly (and a little crazy) homeless guy from Brooklyn, advised me it was recently shut dow. Ah well, sometimes the law rears its ugly head. I won’t risk too much fact checking here, but I was informed it’s like a little village inside there; In-mates can have their families come live with them and can score evenings out on the town if they do good with the guards.

  4. Wind instruments are big in Bolivia. This is the only way someone like Peter Travesi can make it big in this world.

    Wind instruments are big in Bolivia. This is the only way someone like Peter Travesi can make it big in this world.

  5. We are here. In La Paz.

    We are here. In La Paz.

  6. Not only is this monument amusingly graphic, but try to visualize how the statue is sitting/positioned (from the other side). Spotted in Bolivia after our boat-bus crossing, on the way from Copacabana to La Paz.

    Not only is this monument amusingly graphic, but try to visualize how the statue is sitting/positioned (from the other side). Spotted in Bolivia after our boat-bus crossing, on the way from Copacabana to La Paz.

  7. Combined bus + boat travel in Bolivia. Its twice the fun.

    Combined bus + boat travel in Bolivia. Its twice the fun.

  8. 3 April 2012
    cynthiastclair

    Comments

    Lake Titicaca

    Part 1: The Floating Islands (Peru)

    Just offshore from Puno, these islands out in Lake Titicaca are made of grass several meters thick.  Apparently it sinks a little over time, so every year they have to add another meter or so of reeds to the top.  

    These are cold, strange places where the local children are put to work at a young age - showing around the tourists, making and selling little handicrafts and entertaining visitors by singing songs (and generally looking cute).  

    Part 2: Isla del Sol (Bolivia)

    To get there, one starts out on a boat from Copacabana.  Even from shore, you can see the island in the distance but it takes a full 2.5 hours to get there as the boat just putzes along at a CRAWL.  You are able to sit up top, which is nice but cold, or down bottom which isn’t cold but is full of engine fumes.  We started out up top, came down when it started to rain, but then quickly moved back out into the elements once we began to feel sick from the fumes down below.  Frozen is better than sick.  

    Finally we arrived at the North port of the island; it really is a beautiful place.  We hiked the strenuous trail that runs along the ridge from the North to the South of the island and passes through Incan ruins on the way.  The locals have taken it upon themselves to set up toll roads with check points along the way so that you can’t pass unless you have a ticket which costs a few Bolivianos.  Tricky.  

  9. Bolivia, you get me!

    Bolivia, you get me!

  10. Our boat into Lake Titicaca was Inka Class. I’m pretty sure that’s above Nomad class but still below the famed Ethiopian cruiser.

    Our boat into Lake Titicaca was Inka Class. I’m pretty sure that’s above Nomad class but still below the famed Ethiopian cruiser.